Crossing guard clipart black and white fish

In Australia and the United Kingdom, a school crossing supervisor or school crossing patrol officer is commonly known as a lollipop man or lollipop lady, because of the modified circular stop sign he or she carries, which resembles a large lollipop. The term was coined in the 1960s when road safety awareness programmes were rolled out in schools throughout the UK and the crossing patrols were introduced by the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1967. Ventriloquist John Bouchier visited schools nationwide with his ventriloquist dummy to help make children more aware of road safety. During these visits John’s main character, a young boy named Charlie, referred to crossing patrol officers as “Lollipop men” for the first time. The term became widely used very quickly and has crossed into popular culture, both in the folk world (the common morris-dance tune “The Lollipop Man” has lewd lyrics in one tradition), and in the pop world (see the song by the band Sweet).

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